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lundi 30 mars 2015

SUPERBUGS... VIANDES...LA RESISTANCE AUX ANTIBIOTIQUES MENACE LE MONDE

 
The Superbug Apocalyptic Threat Facing The Earth Is Very Real Due To The World's Hunger For Meat
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 DANS LA COURSE EFFRÉNÉE A LA PRODUCTION DE VIANDE, LES ÉLEVEURS PARQUENT DES ANIMAUX DANS DES CONDITIONS EFFRAYANTES, CE NOMBRE DE BETES  CONFINEES ET EN SURNOMBRE TEND A DÉVELOPPER, ET PROPAGER DES MALADIES DE PLUS EN PLUS DIFFICILES A SOIGNER, LES ÉLEVEURS GAVENT LES ANIMAUX D' ANTIBIOTIQUES , MAIS LES BACTÉRIES SONT DE PLUS EN PLUS RÉSISTANTES.... 
 LES CAS EXTRÊMES DE CES ELEVAGES DELIRANTS  SONT VUS EN CHINE ET EN ALLEMAGNE..
 TOUT EST A LIRE, SUPER DOCUMENT!!!  SE PROTÉGER C' EST RENONCER A LA CONSOMMATION DE VIANDES
 GO VEGAN
One of the “apocalyptic” threats facing the Earth is antibiotic resistant bacteria. Infections resistant to antibiotics are kill well over 100,000 people worldwide and independent panel has estimated that global deaths could soar to 10 million a year by 2050 at a cost to the economy of $100 trillion. Even the FDA has conceded that if we don’t phase out antibiotic use in farm animals, the world may be vulnerable to killer diseases in the future.
Due to the vast uses implemented for antimicrobial drugs in both humans and animals, they have contributed to the development of antimicrobial resistance. It is imperative that we begin to eliminate the use of drugs from the food supply.
In the first estimate of its kind, researchers calculate that farmers globally feed 63,000 tonnes of antibiotics to chickens, pigs and cattle every year — and that will climb by 67 per cent, to 106,000 tonnes, by 2030.
Governments around the world consider antimicrobial-resistant bacteria a major threat to public health. Illnesses caused by drug-resistant strains of bacteria are more likely to be potentially fatal when the medicines used to treat them are rendered less effective.
Most of the increase in antibiotic use is expected to be in middle-income countries, but once resistant bacteria appear, they can spread round the world. The problem is getting worse as people become more prosperous and eat more meat and dairy. For example, Tim Robinson of the International Livestock Research Institute in Nairobi, Kenya, and his colleagues calculate that the total biomass of livestock around the world now outstrips that of people, illustrating the size of the demand.

Factory Farming

Traditionally, livestock foraged for grass or scraps in pastures or alleys, but producers worldwide are increasingly switching to intensive production with animals fed in crowded barns, as is already done in rich countries. Low doses of antibiotics are routinely added to the animal feed whether or not they are sick, to make the livestock gain more weight per gram of food eaten and boost farmers’ slender profits.
Use of antibiotics leads to resistant strains of bacteria in animals and in the environment. (Thus, if you get sick from Salmonella, for example, the strain may be resistant to many antibiotics.) Meat from corn-fed cattle is also far more contaminated with E coli bacteria, partly because corn interferes with ruminant digestion, and partly because the animals are crowded together in filthy conditions. E. coli levels are much lower in grass-fed cattle.
Some 80 per cent of the antibiotics consumed in the US go to livestock, but there were no figures for global consumption. To find out, Robinson’s team looked at the amount of antibiotics farmers in rich countries feed to their intensively reared livestock. Then they mapped pig, chicken and cattle populations worldwide, noting the proportions that are raised intensively, and how that is predicted to grow over the next decades. With the help of a computer model they calculated the antibiotics consumption of each country’s livestock.
China is the worst offender, with its livestock consuming 15,000 tonnes a year, 50 per cent more than the US, the next on the list. Surprisingly, given the 2006 European Union ban on antibiotic growth-promoters, Germany is the fourth-highest consumer.