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mercredi 2 août 2017

BEYOND BURGER

SOURCE ET SUITE
 AVEC VIDEO

 LE PLUS GRAND HYPERMARCHE DES USA  S' OFFRE UN NOUVEAU BURGER AU  RAYON VIANDES..
UNE NOUVELLE  VIANDES VEGETALE..
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BEYOND MEAT... OU ENCORE AU DELA DE LA VIANDE...

PETIT A PETIT LE MARCHE AUGMENTE, GRACE AUX CONSOMMATEURS  PRETS A CHANGER LEURS HABITUDES ALIMENTAIRES..
LE PREMIER BEYOND BURGER A ETE COMMERCIALISE EN 2016 ... A WHOLE FOOD..
LE GOUT DE LA VIANDE ENCORE PLUS REUSSI SEMBLE-T-IL ..........


The largest supermarket in the U.S. has a new name in the meat aisle. It just so happens that it’s not made of meat.
The plant-based Beyond Burger, made by startup Beyond Meat, began rolling out in more than 600 Kroger-owned (kr, +0.12%) stores in June—a move that has more than tripled the burger's distribution within two months.
“It’s a very strong signal,” Beyond Meat CEO and founder Ethan Brown tells Fortune. “Much of the world is drawn toward animal protein as a source of protein,” he adds, but “that is really starting to change.”
The Beyond Burger first went into Whole Foods (wfm, -0.10%) in 2016, but the admittance into Kroger—and Safeway (swy) a few months prior—is an indication that meat alternatives are gaining appeal among the mainstream who may be looking to cut down on their meat consumption for environmental, animal welfare, and health reasons. The Beyond Burger has half the saturated fat compared to a burger made with the real thing and is cholesterol free.
Brown wants his product to appeal to meat eaters rather than just the small percentage of the U.S. population that is vegan or vegetarian. by making a burger that is “indistinguishable from the animal protein equivalent." He's also "adamant that it has to get in the meat case.” When the product first went into Whole Foods, the company found the burger's turnover was vastly improved when it was in the meat case. "People are not looking for protein next to ice cream," Brown says.
In this case, Kroger was the pursuer. Russ Richardson, Kroger’s vice president of meat and seafood, first read about Beyond Meat in a trade magazine and reached out to the company through Tyson (tsn, +1.16%), which has a 5% stake in the startup.
“I thought it would have a great following based on how eating habits are changing,” Richardson says. “It’s different from anything else we offer in the meat department today.”