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vendredi 16 juin 2017

ACTION.. STOP EXPORT DE CHEVAUX DU CANADA VERS LA JAPON


 slaughtered horses



SOOURCE ET SUITE
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ICI

 AVEC VIDEO

CREDIT PHOTO


CHAQUE ANNÉE, LE CANADA EXPÉDIE 6000 CHEVAUX AU JAPON (PAR AVION)
16-18 HEURES DE VOL
 TELLEMENT TASSES LES UNS  CONTRE LES AUTRES, " COMME DES SARDINES" QU' ILS SE PIÉTINENT PARFOIS  . SOUVENT AUCUNE EAU N' EST  FOURNIE ..
PETA A FILME  DES SCÈNES A L ' ABATTOIR
 SIGNER POUR STOPPER CES EXPORTS DÉMENTIELS DE CHEVAUX..DONT CERTAINS SEMBLENT MEME PROVENIR DES USA






It seems almost too preposterous to be true: Every year, more than 6,000 live horses in Canada are packed into transport crates and sent on harrowing flights halfway around the world to be slaughtered in Japan.
PETA's video investigation reveals what happens in Japan to horses who are no longer wanted.



Now, a recent exposé by Canada's Global News shows that live horses are crammed into wooden shipping crates before being loaded onto cargo planes destined for Japan. Horses are often deprived of food and water and packed so tightly that they're unable to stand naturally for the duration of the 16- to 18-hour flight. Numerous horses have died during landing accidents or "due to a combination of a substantial delay, the large size of the horses, and significant stress levels in the animals." One horse, on a flight out of Calgary, was discovered dead and upside down in a crate.
The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is supposed to ensure that horses are segregated based on height and compatibility. But Dr. Maureen Harper, a former veterinarian with the CFIA, revealed a different reality: "They're being shipped unsegregated. I was just horrified. They're basically stuffing them in like a can of sardines." She further explained that it's impossible for any veterinarian to separate the horses adequately, stating, "The CFIA is knowingly not enforcing their own regulations. No veterinarian, on the ground, on the spot, can decide which horse is compatible with which horse at the time of loading. There's no way.