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dimanche 3 juillet 2016

COLONIE DE VACANCES AVEC MENUS VEGAN ET COMPASSION

SOURCE ET SUITE

 NOUS SOMMES TOTALEMENT CONVAINCUS QU' IL N' Y A RIEN A ESPERER DE LA GENERATION BARBECUE....
NOUS LE VOYONS UN PEU PLUS CHAQUE JOUR DANS LES COMPORTEMENT VICIEUX DES  30/60  ANS.
 ILS NE PENSENT MEME PAS A CHANGER LEUR MONDE
 PEUT ETRE RESTE T IL UN ESPOIR POUR LA GENERATION SUIVANTE????
 A SUIVRE


The sun is up, school is out and kids are off to camp. Some will play soccer, others will improve their math skills and a select number will learn how to change the world for the better in camps designed to build the activists of the future.
“Young people when they learn about a problem in our world, they want to fix it,” says Nora Kramer, founder and executive director of Youth Empowered Action Camp (YEA Camp). “Adults tend to be more jaded and say, ‘what can I do about that? That’s just the way it is.’”
Kramer, a long time activist with a background in education, started the camp in 2009 after seeing how well kids responded to an “Animals and the Environment” class she taught. After failing to find any other places where kids inspired to make a change could go to improve their skills, she created YEA Camp, which is now offered in California, Massachusetts and New York — with a vegan menu to go with its compassionate 
“We have kids who are superstars and have already started nonprofits at 10 years old and there are others who are still trying to figure out what they can do,” explains Kramer of the up to 50 kids who participate in every session. “Most of our campers are kids who really care about what’s happening in our world and really want to make a difference.”
Kramer says some parents find out about the camp and tell their kids about it, but in most cases, it is the kids who persuade the parents to enroll them.
While some may think that exposing their kids to the problems of the world like war, climate change, animal cruelty and social injustice may be harsh, Dr. Kimberly Spanjol from Youth Animal Protectors, a program that teaches kids compassion through animal protection issues, says if done correctly, it can affect them deeply in a positive way.
“In the right balance you’re giving them tools to help others and themselves too,” says Spanjol. “All the latest research supports that teaching kids to be in service and to help others, helps their own happiness. You’re also giving them the skill of problem solving which will make them more effective in the job market.”