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dimanche 5 juin 2016

TEMOIGNAGES DE CAMERAS CACHEES...

SOURCE ET SUITE
 TÉMOIGNAGES DE QQ PERSONNES AYANT FILME EN CAMERA CACHÉE... POIGNANT!!
  ILS SE SONT FAIT EMPLOYER DANS LES ZOOS,  LES CIRQUES OU LES ÉLEVAGES 
 ILS FRAPPENT MÊME DES VEAUX AVEUGLES QUI NE PEUVENT PAS SE LEVER..
 ILS ONT VU DES POULES ENTERRÉES VIVANTES ETC ETC...

Equipped with hidden cameras and a thirst for justice, animal rights undercover investigators infiltrate factory farms, circuses, roadside zoos, labs and other facilities where animals are known to be mistreated. Investigators gather the necessary evidence to show the world — and authorities — what really goes on behind closed doors. Catching animal abusers in the act isn’t easy, but it’s the job description of animal rights undercover investigators.
The investigative footage is hard to watch — so much so that the news media rarely shows videos and images when reporting on the issue. The live version is even tougher to endure, so how do they do it? Mike Wolf, Investigations Manager for Compassion Over Killing, TJ Tumasse, Manager of Investigations for the Animal Legal Defense Fund, and Taylor Radig, a former investigator for PETA  and Compassion Over Killing all spent years undercover. We asked them what the experience was really like.
How did you end up working as an undercover investigator?
Mike Wolf: After my dog died I started becoming more aware of things and started seeing how animals were treated. In a few weeks I became vegetarian and wanted to help animals.
T.J. Tumasse: I read “Animal Liberation,” by Peter Singer, and I didn’t make it through two chapters before deciding I was going vegan and fighting for animals. I sent an email to PETA wanting to get involved as an artist and at the end I just said, “by the way, I’m 6’4, 200 pounds and a pretty intimidating former football player,” and then they got back to me about being an investigator.
Taylor Radig:  Seeing an undercover investigation was what started my journey into animal protection work. I believe that people’s circle of compassion is in constant flux — bending, shifting and expanding — and I think undercover investigations are one of the most powerful tools we have in allowing people to see why animals are in desperate need to become a part of that circle.
What was your first day undercover like? Was it what you were expecting?
Wolf: I started out at a zoo. I spent about four months there and it was eye-opening. There were weeks that animals barely got fed. Seeing first-hand what was happening just pushed me harder to keep on doing it.

Tumasse: The first job I got was at a factory farm, in a slaughterhouse owned by Tyson in Georgia. I thought I was prepared, and when it came down to it the reality was much different. When you’re actually exposed to it there’s nothing that compares. A part of me never left and I’ll never get that part of me back. It changes who you are.
Radig: My first day at Quanah Cattle Company, my coworker called me over to show me this blind calf. When I came over, he showed me the blue color of this tiny baby calf’s eyes as he sat on the ground, too sick to stand. Knowing how sick this calf was, my coworker repeatedly kicked this baby calf over and over to try to get him to stand, when he very clearly couldn’t even muster the energy to stand even though he was being kicked. It took everything in my body to not scream at my coworker in that moment.