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jeudi 4 février 2016

LES SECRETS REPUGNANTS DE L' ELEVAGE INDUSTRIEL ET DE L' ELEVAGE BIO

SOURCE ET SUITE

 AVEC DE NOMBREUX LIENS A LIRE

 ILS ONT VISITE UNE FERME DANS L' IOWA CE QU' ILS ONT VU ÉTAIT CHOQUANT...
LES COCHONS ÉTAIENT TRÈS SALES , CONFINES DANS DE TRÈS PETITS ESPACES, ILS PIÉTINAIENT DANS LEURS EXCRÉMENTS
 IL Y AVAIT UNE VENTILATION ............... DES VENTILATEURS TOURNAIENT MAIS NE PARVENAIENT PAS A DISSIPER L' ODEUR D' AMMONIAQUE  ET DE SULFATE QUI LAISSAIT PENSER QUE SI LES FANS S' ARRÊTAIENT ILS MOURRAIENT RAPIDEMENT.. ASPHYXIES

 100 MILLIONS DE COCHONS PAR AN  SONT ÉLEVÉS DE CETTE MANIÈRE
PUIS IL EST ALLÉ VISITER UNE FERME BIO, L' ÉLEVAGE ETAIT NETTEMENT PLUS ACCEPTABLE, MOINS D; ANTIBIOTIQUES AUSSI...

MAIS LORSQU' IL A POSE LA QUESTION QUI TUE:
 COMMENT SONT ILS ABATTUS???
 IL S' EST AVÉRÉ QUE C' ÉTAIT TOUT AUSSI.... INHUMAIN DISONS.. QUOIQUE LES EMPLOYÉS DISPOSENT DE PLUS DE TEMPS....


 PUIS ILS PARLENT DES VACHES DONT L' UNE JUSTEMENT EST EN TRAIN DE GEMIR...
LE SHOCK ELECTRIQUE NE L' A PAS ETOURDIE, NI INSENSIBILISEE, CE QUI ARRIVE  REGULIEREMENT. ELLE DEVRA DONC RECEVOIR UNE BALLE DANS LA TETE

The reporter goes on to explain how the cow’s mooing is a result of her smelling the blood and knowing what’s coming. He also describes how two cows didn’t initially go “lights out” with the first electrical stun, something that happens on average to two cows per day. Per the USDA guidelines, such failure to kill the animal “will be painful for the animal. It will feel a large electric shock or heart attack signs, even though it may be paralyzed and unable to move.” In that case, the cows then had to be shot with a 9 mm to die. To humans an execution style shot to a victim’s head would be considered a violent crime. To the farmed animals it is humane.
 


 

It’s no surprise that the meat industry has secrets. From the way the animals are treated to where the final product actually comes from, slaughterhouses aren’t exactly transparent. Then there’s humane meat, the meat industry’s more socially accepted sister, but despite its reputation, this one too has a few skeletons in its closet.
Author Barry Estabrook recently uncovered the pork industry’s secrets in his latest book “Pig Tales: An Omnivore’s Quest for Sustainable Meat,” and it was at one his talks about the book that I found humane meat’s secrets.
Estabrooke told the audience at the University of South Florida about his quest to find how bacon was produced. He visited a farm in Iowa whose owner boasted about doing everything by the book, with impeccable “bio security” and effective slaughter. What he saw was shocking.
“These pigs live in absolute filth,” he told of how the animals were crammed into a barn with little to no space to move leaving them to step and live on their own excrements. “They’re kept alive by gigantic fans and there’s so much ammonia and sulfate in the air that if something happens to those fans they die in a matter or hours.”
According to Estabrook, 100 million pigs are raised roughly every year in the U.S., 97 percent of them in similar conditions in factory farms. After seeing that sight, in his words, “it wasn’t looking good for me and bacon,” but then he went to a humane farm.
The Niman Ranch, he explained, raised their pigs on pasture, the animals never see an antibiotic and, as he showed in a slideshow, they get to frolic in the grass, take in the sun and live a wonderful life. His conclusion then was simple:

It’s no surprise that the meat industry has secrets. From the way the animals are treated to where the final product actually comes from, slaughterhouses aren’t exactly transparent. Then there’s humane meat, the meat industry’s more socially accepted sister, but despite its reputation, this one too has a few skeletons in its closet.
Author Barry Estabrook recently uncovered the pork industry’s secrets in his latest book “Pig Tales: An Omnivore’s Quest for Sustainable Meat,” and it was at one his talks about the book that I found humane meat’s secrets.
Estabrooke told the audience at the University of South Florida about his quest to find how bacon was produced. He visited a farm in Iowa whose owner boasted about doing everything by the book, with impeccable “bio security” and effective slaughter. What he saw was shocking.
“These pigs live in absolute filth,” he told of how the animals were crammed into a barn with little to no space to move leaving them to step and live on their own excrements. “They’re kept alive by gigantic fans and there’s so much ammonia and sulfate in the air that if something happens to those fans they die in a matter or hours.”
According to Estabrook, 100 million pigs are raised roughly every year in the U.S., 97 percent of them in similar conditions in factory farms. After seeing that sight, in his words, “it wasn’t looking good for me and bacon,” but then he went to a humane farm.
The Niman Ranch, he explained, raised their pigs on pasture, the animals never see an antibiotic and, as he showed in a slideshow, they get to frolic in the grass, take in the sun and live a wonderful life. His conclusion then was simple:


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