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mercredi 29 juillet 2015

CECIL LE LION .... LE CABINET DENTAIRE FERME ET LUTTE CONTRE LES FANS DE TROPHEES USA


 


SOURCE SUITE ET VIDEO DE CECIL
CREDIT PHOTO 
 AVEC PETITION A SIGNER

 CE FOU DE LA GACHETTE MASSACRAIT DES ANIMAUX  DEPUIS LONGTEMPS  DONT RHINOCEROS BUFFLES  ET AUTRES
 60% DU BUSINESS DE CARNAGE SAFARI  EST CONSTITUE D' AMERICAINS!!!

With one shot of his bow, Walter Palmer went from being a Minneapolis dentist to the world’s most reviled big game hunter.
The public outcry following his hunt of Zimbabwe’s famous tourist attraction, Cecil the Lion, has not only led to the closure of his dental office but could be a galvanizing force in altering the trophy hunting industry in the United States that’s fueling wildlife loss in Africa, according to conservationists.

Killing rare animals is nothing new for the dentist, who has crossbow records for killing a menagerie’s worth of wildlife, including rhino, warthogs, buffalo, and more. But none of his kills brought a spotlight on the contentious issue of trophy hunting until he and his hired Zimbabwean hunters lured the black-maned Cecil out from the protection of national park boundaries with bait.
The heavily studied lion—he had a GPS collar on when he was shot—wandered wounded for 40 hours before finally being tracked down and shot with a gun by the hunters.
“I’ve never seen any sort of animal issue resonate like this before,” said Beth Allgood, campaigns director at the International Fund for Animal Welfare. When she first heard the reports about Cecil’s death at the hands of a Spaniard, Allgood was a little surprised, but then it was revealed the hunter was an American—a story line Allgood with her 20 years in conservation work is familiar with.
“Americans don’t like to accept the role we play in wildlife trade,” Allgood said. “We like to look at China fueling demand and Africa not doing enough to protect these animals, but when it comes to lions, we have a big part in it.”
RELATED: An American Dentist Killed Zimbabwe’s Famous Lion
Americans traveling to Africa make up more than 60 percent of the foreign-participated lion trophy hunts carried out each year, according to John Jackson, president of the lobbying group Conservation Force. About 15,000 hunters make the trek annually, and a majority of them want to bring back a trophy, Jackson said. The group argues that lion hunts are integral to the species’ conservation, and the big game industry—worth $675 million in South Africa alone—brings in money for habitat expansion and species conservation efforts.
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