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dimanche 12 avril 2015

LES ELEVEURS CONTRE ATTAQUENT

SOURCE ET SUITE

DE   PLUS EN PLUS ACCUSES DE LA MAUVAISE SANTÉ DES AMÉRICAINS, LES ELEVEURS VEULENT (AVEC DES MENSONGES BIEN SUR) DÉFENDRE LA NÉCESSITÉ D'UN REGIME CARNE DANS L' ALIMENTATION ET POURTANT LES RAPPORTS ANTI VIANDE SONT BIEN DOCUMENTES....
QUI GAGNERA??

The meat industry is sharpening its knives over a small federal committee that issued sweeping nutrition advice that essentially told Americans to drop the burger and grab a handful of kale.
The beef and pork associations spent months sweating as the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee worked on developing a large book of nutrition advice that would not only encourage Americans to eat less red meat but single out the livestock industry for contributing to environmental problems.
If adopted by the departments of Agriculture and Health and Human Services as a part of their every-five-year exercise to educate the public about how to eat healthier, the suggestions could not only influence consumer decisions but also be used to guide federal nutrition policy, including the $16 billion school lunch program.
So, now that the committee has spoken, delivering its 571-page report Thursday, the defenders of meat — among the most powerful lobbyists — are planning to attack the panel’s suggestions on multiple fronts. They will lobby Congress to help influence the federal agencies and form a coalition to request an extension of the report’s comment period from 45 days to 120, said Dave Warner, a spokesman for the National Pork Producers Council.
The industry wants to use the additional time to investigate the studies relied upon by the 14-member panel to draw its conclusions.
“I think they are off-base when it comes to meat,” Warner said of the report. “We’ll go through it with a fine-tooth comb. We certainly will then talk to lawmakers about it and express to them our concerns. We’ll certainly educate them about the role of meat, especially lean meat, in a healthy diet.”
Meat producers aren’t the only members of the food industry worried about the panel’s report.
The report issued Thursday outlines a dramatic departure in the panel’s approach to improving the nation’s health, a heavier-handed vision than those provided by previous panels for how individuals, government and industry can work in tandem to tackle poor nutrition and environmental concerns. Critics complain it goes too far with too little scientific evidence. Advocates argue they’re trying to repair a nation wrought with crippling health problems.
The panel’s many suggestions reflect the attitude on display at meetings last year: The American diet is in shambles.
The committee says it consulted studies that painted a stark picture of American health, where people develop type 2 diabetes in their youth, and 65 percent of women and 70 percent of men are overweight or obese. Nearly half of added sugars in the American diet come from sweetened beverages, not including milk or fruit juices, and 31 percent come from snacks and sweets.