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vendredi 6 mars 2015

ELEVAGES ET CES DECHETS QUI VOUS VEULENT DU MAL..

UN ASPECT TROP SOUVENT IGNORE DE L' ÉLEVAGE, LA POLLUTION DES SOLS ET DES EAUX...  PAR DES BACTÉRIES MORTELLES DUE AUX DÉCHETS, TEL LE   E COLI
 ICI RAPPORT DE CAROLINE DU NORD

 SOURCE ET SUITE

Waste water full of excrement and urine is being dumped into the ecosystems of North Carolina, causing untold environmental damage and putting human health at risk, yet the local government seems completely uninterested in investigating the situation.
Researchers found that nearly a quarter of water samples tested in the region contained unsafe amounts of E.coli and fecal bacteria, a direct result of the waste from huge scale factory farms.
North Carolina produces more than 4 billion pounds of pork per year, making it the second largest pork producer in the U.S., after Iowa. In some regions, such as Duplin County, there are more pigs than humans, with farmers raising 2 million pigs each year in a region with a population of just 60,000.
Despite the huge concentration of pigs in this region, government laws classify huge factory farm operations with thousands of pigs as “non-discharge facilities,” meaning that they are not regulated on the amount of sewage waste they produce, nor where they dump it.
Inside the factory farms, the pig’s excrement and urine is washed out of the pens through holes in the floor, and piped in to huge open lakes on the property. As there is a constant need for more waste to be pumped out, water from the sewage lakes are sprayed onto the surrounding agricultural fields at a rate of hundreds of gallons per minute, and it eventually seeps through into the waterways. The water is also indiscriminately dispersed into the surrounding environment and people’s homes during the spraying process.
Shocking Pollution Statistics
From 2010 to 2011 a research team from the university of North Carolina and John Hopkins University conducted extensive testing in the waters of North Carolina, specifically testing the water upstream and downstream from fields near the state’s major factory farms. Due to the lax regulations on the treatment of waste from these farms, millions of tons of sewage water are ending up in the waterways, and the stats are from the study are extremely worrying.
Out of 187 samples from Duplin County, over 40 percent were found to have fecal coliform and animal fecal bacteria counts exceeding safe water guidelines set by state and federal authorities. Almost a quarter (23 percent) of the samples tested were found to contain unsafe amounts of the E.coli bacteria, and around two thirds (61 percent) contained excessive amounts of Enterococcus.
Why Would the Authorities Ignore the Issue?
With such alarming readings being found in the county’s natural water systems, you might expect the government to be jumping into action to prevent the environmental and public health disaster from becoming any worse, but instead, they have done almost nothing about it.
Drew Elliot from the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources said that the study “seems to be inconclusive.” His statement also claimed that, “The information presented provides an indication of overall water quality in these [waters]; however, it is not an indication of a discharge of waste.” When questioned on the issue further, the response was that it was difficult to determine the source of the contamination as fecal pollution could include “any warm blooded animals and failing septic or sewage collection systems.”
It seems as if the large scale farming operations who are clearly responsible for this dangerous water pollution are being given a free pass from the authorities, who are refusing to accept the evidence presented to them by scientific researchers.