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vendredi 30 janvier 2015

FIRST CLASS FLIGHTS FOR PETS JFK USA

VOYAGER AVEC SON CHIEN OU SON CHAT EN AVION SERA BIENTOT MOINS RISQUE
 SOURCE ET SUITE
 PARTICULIEREMENT RECOMMANDE POUR LES ANIMAUX AUX NEZ COURT PEKINOIS, BULLDOGS, PERSANS QUI ONT BCP PLUS DE DIFFICULTES  A  RESPIRER
 CELA VA DEBUTER A NEW YORK ET ESPERONS SERA COPIE DANS D' AUTRES AEROPORTS...

We know that flying isn’t an occurrence that most pets enjoy. A seemingly innocent flight can be fatal to living, sentient beings who are treated like cargo objects.  But the sixth busiest airport in the United States is giving all animals a much-needed upgrade with their new pet project called ARK.
Flying with Animals is Risky Business
There’s been some serious drama involving pets and planes lately. An emotional support pig was kicked off a flight for making a pigsty, including relieving himself in the aisles. More recently, a Florida woman is accused of drowning a puppy in the airport bathroom after being too old the puppy was too young to fly.
These instances aside, routine flights can be seriously dangerous for some pets. Alaska Airlines proves it. According to The Seattle Times, 62 animals have been reported injured, lost or discovered dead on the major airline since 2010.
And some animals — especially brachycephalic dogs and cats — have no business being on a plane. It’s hard to miss the brachycephalic feature: think of those tiny, short noses on beloved English bulldogs, pug dogs and Persian cats. While adorable, short noses leave pets susceptible to “in-flight suffocation.” Smithsonian Magazine reports how 91 of the 189 flight-related deaths that occurred between June 2005 and June 2011 were brachycephalic animals.
From Cargo to Class
One airport in the Big Apple is done treating pets like cargo and is looking out for our companion animals. As reported in Travel Pulse, our beloved animal friends, from pets to exotic animals, will get to travel in first-class style. The undertaking will take place in New York, New York’s John F. Kennedy (JFK) International Airport. JFK is devoting an entire empty building (Building 78) and 14.4 acres of ground area to this new pet project that will cost $32 million and  handle roughly 70,000 domestic and wild animals annually,” says the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey press release. It will offer a state-of-the-art veterinary hospital, animal daycare services and more efficient ways to transport animals worldwide. The pet project is affectionately called ARK and it consists of a 20-year lease agreement. ARK is set to “come to fruition” in the early part time of 2016.